Webinar: Substantive Law - Family Law

Canadian Association of Law Libraries Webinar Series

Thursday, January 21st, 2016

10:00am - 11:30am 

Summary:
This session will provide a summary on family law issues including:
a) Parenting;
b) Support obligations, including child and spousal support;
c) Property division;
d) Rights of unmarried spouses; and,
e) Divorce
Speaker:
Mimi Marrello practices in the Family Law Service Group at Mann Lawyers and teaches the Introduction to Family Law course at the University of Ottawa. Since becoming a lawyer, she has focused her practice on family law. She is a past board member of Family Services Ottawa/Services à la famille d'Ottawa, and is currently the Co-Chair of the Annual Family Law Institute Conference held in Ottawa each year. She obtained a law degree in 1999 and was then called to Bar in Ontario in 2001.

Webinar Costs:
CALL/ACBD Member: $40 + HST = $45.20 
Non-member: $60 + HST = $67.80
Student Rate: $25 + HST = $28.25
To Register, Click Here 

Question re CLE Webinars and Course Material

Question for the cataloguers out there - how are you treating the CLE Course Materials and Webinar Archives?

We have been cataloguing to the individual paper level until now - this month and last month I noticed that there were often only 1 or 2 papers included in a course, whereas there are multiple sessions linked in the Webinar Archives (see the Expert Evidence - 2015 for an example: 1 paper, 7 webinars).  

As the webinars are very well indexed, I see a value in cataloguing to the individual webinar level as well. Is anyone else doing this?

Any thoughts, suggestions, and opinions are welcome. And thank you!

Marnie 

 

New content on BC Laws

The following content is now available on the BC Laws site:

  • Act/Ministry Responsibilities
  • Archived Consolidations of Statutes
  • Archived Consolidation of Regulations 
  • Bills
  • Consolidated Provisions in Force
  • Defunct Regulations
  • Minister of Finance Directives
  • Ministerial Orders
  • Proclamations
  • Regulation Bulletins
  • Rules of Court and Related Enactments
  • Table of Repealed, Replaced and Renamed Public Statutes

November Seminar - The Art of Speaking for Success

Please join VALL for our November seminar “The Art of Speaking for Success” where guest speaker Dorothea Hendriks will cover the topic of effective communication and delivery of our message to management, peers, lawyers, in training, and with vendors.

In this workshop we look at:

  • Engaging your listener without handcuffs
  • Basic body language dos and don’ts
  • Art of asking questions
  • Communication styles
  • Attitude and action

Dorothea Hendriks provides professionals with the tools they need to increase their confidence levels, express ideas with greater clarity and impact others with their message.  

An educator and former instructor at Vancouver Community College, she has presented to over 5,000 people, delivering workshops, keynotes and coaching sessions focused on speaking and presentation skills.

Dorothea is the owner of Art of Speaking for Success and Presentation Skills Inc. and passionate about helping people experience the benefits of becoming more effective communicators.

This seminar will also be the last of 2015 so we encourage you to come see some old friends and new colleagues before the rush of Christmas descends.

Date: Tuesday, November 24th, 2015

Webinar: Collaborating to Preserve and Access Legal Information

CALL/ACBD Webinar 

Wednesday, October 28th, 2015 1:00PM - 2:30 EST

The rate at which information is created in the modern world is astonishing. 90% of the world's data has been generated in the past two years! This explosive pace is quickly exceeding our ability to manage legal information using traditional management models. The need to collaborate around the preservation of and access to legal information has never been more apparent.

Professional development opportunity: LLEAD: Library Leaders Excellence and Development

I recently went for lunch with Ken Haycock, and he let me know about this interesting leadership development opportunity in the new year:

LLEAD: Library Leadership Excellence and Development

The ultimate vision of this program is a library sector with the leadership capacity to best serve and advance the quality of life for the people who live and work in their communities.

To realize this vision, the program will focus on its goal of equipping library leaders with the approaches, processes and competencies demanded in senior leadership roles.

LLEAD participants are expected to practice and improve skills that are directly transferable to the library environment in organizational leadership, teamwork, finance, human resources management, and advocacy.  At the end of the year-long program, successful LLEAD participants will demonstrate the resilience, self-awareness and abilities to influence strategic outcomes at the organizational and community level.

You can learn more about it here.

A new information resource for Vancouver real propery

I was lucky enough to attend the Pacific Legal Technology Conference last week and heard about a new information resource from the City of Vancouver. It's called Vanmap and there was talk that the precision of free governmental information will change the responsibility of lawyers in real property transations.

Here's the main page, and here's a screenshot of the listing for the Vancouver Convention Centre:

Vanmap screenshot

I was asked for a few more details, so here they are:

The case that discussed the standard of care for real estate lawyers in surveying is Winrob et ux v. Street and Wollen, 19 D.L.R. (2d) 172, 28 W.W.R. 118. At the scale of the published surveying maps available in the 1950's the lines dividing lots would scale up to 10 feet wide in the real world. The data available on Vanmaps allows users to see maps with property lines at a of detail that translates to a few centimeters.

Cinderella at the Ball: Legislative Intent in Canadian Courts

Cinderella at the Ball: Legislative Intent in Canadian Courts
Erica Anderson; Susan Barker

This article explores a very specific kind of legal research - finding the intent of a legislature or parliament. Following a review of the history of legislative intent in Canadian courts, the exclusionary rule and an important Canadian case, Rizzo & Rizzo Shoes Ltd, the authors explore what developments in this area of law, statutory interpretation and, legislative intent research, might mean for parliamentary and legislative libraries in Canada. Based on research for their forthcoming Irwin Law book Researching Legislative Intent: A Practical Guide, this revised article was first presented to the Association of Parliamentary Libraries in Canada/ L’Association des bibliothèques parlementaires au Canada (APLIC/ABPAC) on July 4, 2013, in Ottawa, Ontario.

American statutory interpretation guru William Eskridge once referred to statutory interpretration as “the Cinderella of legal scholarship. Once scorned and neglected, confined to the kitchen, it now dances in the ballroom.”1 Cited in a 1999 article by Stephen Ross, an American law professor who encourages Canadian legal scholars to devote more time to teaching statutory interpretation,2 this quote perfectly captures the explosion of statutory interpretation scholarship that Ross sees happening in Canada. A fascinating area of legal research – which includes legislative intent – statutory interpretation also has a very important and practical use in courts. When the outcome of a case hinges on the meaning of a few words in a statute, interpreting the meaning of those few words will affect someone’s life and rights, one way or another.

What is legislative intent research?

Our interest in legislative intent stems from our experience in law and legislative libraries. In our law and legislative libraries finding the intent behind a statute it is a source of many substantial research questions. Let’s look at an example of a question often posed to legislative researchers:

Question: I would like you to search Hansard, policy papers, and committee Hansard for all discussion surrounding the Act X dating all the way back in time when the predecessor of this legislation was introduced which I believe was prior to 1900. We are interested in determining the meaning of “Y” and if it includes “A and B.”

The kinds of questions that law librarians get that require researching legislative intent include: Can I have the Hansard and committee debate on this bill and the predecessor bills? What did the legislature mean by this phrase? Why and when was this section added to the statute?

These questions can be time consuming and finding the answers can be like finding a needle in a haystack. Discovering the intent of a legislature involves piecing together how the legislation evolved over time, if and how the enactment changed, and what legislators said about this change in Hansard and committee. It can also involve material that inspired the legislation such as reports from law commissions, government policy papers, or Commissions of Inquiry.

Researching legislative intent can feel like Cinderella, pre-ball – all work, confined to the stacks in the library. Paul Michel, writing about statutory interpretation in the McGill Law Journal in 1996, agrees; he said that “the process of statutory interpretation is the unsung workhorse of the law. All but ignored by the law schools, lacking the high profile of constitutional interpretation, the interpretation of statutes is, nevertheless, the most common task of the courts and administrative tribunals. Common, yes; but essential, too.”3

Parliamentary, law firm and academic law libraries all get these questions and provide the materials to help with this research. In parliamentary libraries, librarians have to be careful to find out if the question is part of a legal matter before court. In these cases we cannot assist with it, so it is often a delicate dance deciding what information we can provide. Still, even in that context we may be able to point clients in the right direction by providing bill reading dates and Hansard materials without any analysis of a particular phrase.

There are many terms used to describe this type of research and it helps to define some terms we use in researching legislative intent. Librarians, judges and lawyers all use the term legislative history, but they use it to mean different things. People also use the term “backtracking” to describe the research process. Relying on the definitions that Ruth Sullivan uses in her book, The Construction of Statutes, legislative evolution

consists of successive enacted versions from inception to current formulation or to its displacement or repeal.4

Legislative History

includes everything that relates to [a statute’s] conception, preparation and passage… from the earliest proposals to royal assent. This includes reports of law reform commissions, …; departmental and committee studies and recommendations; proposals and memoranda submitted to Cabinet; the remarks of the minister responsible for the bill; materials tabled or otherwise brought to the attention of the legislature during the legislative process including explanatory notes; materials published by the government during the legislative process, such as explanatory papers or press releases; legislative committee hearings and reports; debates…; the records of motions to amend the bill; regulatory impact analysis statements; and more.5

Put simply, legislative evolution is the statute and its changes. Legislative history is everything surrounding those changes. Both evolution and history are used by lawyers and judges to determine the intent of Parliament.

It is from these questions, that we began to see a research opportunity here. We felt that these types of questions, looking for the intent of parliament, were being posed more frequently in law and legislative libraries. We also wanted to peek on the other side of these questions to see why and how legislative history materials are used in the courts. Though not trained lawyers, we would like to share some of what we have learned so far. By looking deeper into these questions we help our clients become better at answering them and, in turn, we get better ourselves. Like Cinderella we are excited to “go to the ball,” as it were, and bring to light the details, processes and places for researching legislative intent to aid legal researchers.

Why researching legislative intent is important

READ MORE here- http://www.revparl.ca/english/issue.asp?param=223&art=1642


Canadian Parliamentary Review Cover

Vol 38 no 2
2015

Conducting Business and Industry Research

CALL / ACBD Webinar

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

1:00pm - 2:30 EST

Summary:

This webinar provides an introduction to conducting research on business and industry information. The session will provide tips and tricks for:

  • Defining business and market research
  • Sourcing company lists and finding information on specific businesses
  • Finding and using industry level information, including statistics, financial data, market trends and more

The session explores both free and fee-based sources within Canada

Speaker:

Heidi Schiller is the Manager of InfoAction, Vancouver Public Library’s fee-based research service. Originally from the U.S., Heidi worked as a business reporter at the Bellingham Business Journal before getting her Masters in Library and Information Studies at the University of British Columbia. 

Webinar Costs:

CALL/ACBD Member: $40 + $5.20 HST    = $45.20/webinar

Non-member: $60 + $7.80 HST    = $67.80/webinar

Student Rate: $25 + $3.25 HST    = $28.25/webinar

Click here to register
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